Monthly Archives: June 2011

Inside Commodore DOS [PDF]


Richard Immers and Gerald G. Neufeld:
Inside Commodore DOS : the complete guide to the 1541 disk operating system.
Northridge, Calif. : Datamost, 1985.
ISBN 0-8359-3091-2

(512 pages, 7.4 MB PDF)

In my quest to preserve retrocomputing documents, here is the invaluable book “Inside Commodore DOS”, which describes most of the internals of the Commodore 1541 disk drive. The scanning was done in 2002 by Kenneth S. Moore, who in 2005 released an OCRed version, which unfortunately replaced the original page images. My version here comes with the original page images and a table of contents, and is nevertheless fully searchable.

Here is a fun quote from the book by the way:

Over the years numerous writers have advised Commodore owners not to use the save and replace command because it contained a bug. Our study of the ROM routines and a lot of testing has convinced us that the bug in the replace command is a myth.

Of course, this is wrong. Don’t use “SAVE@” on a 1541.

Racism in Monstropolis

Sometimes, freezeframe fun does not provide fun, but sadness.

In the Pixar movie Monsters Inc., you can see the following file of a child at 12 min 40 sec:

Monsters scare children at night, and this is how they keep track of them. The file comes with a blueprint of the room, a list of date stamps, business-critical notes like “scared of snakes”, and the standard data like name, gender, age, and… uh, race??

Albert Lozano, age 8, seems to be “hispanic”, and for monsters, this is apparently a feature that is important to them.

Oh well, that’s Monstropolis, a world inhabited by monsters that scare little children. Modern societies, on the other hand, have understood that “race” is a detail that is just as useful to track as shoe size. Oh wait.


Commodore 128 Programmer's Reference Guide (PDF)


Commodore Business Machines.
Commodore 128 Programmer’s Reference Guide.
New York, NY: Bantam Books, 1986.
ISBN 0-553-34378-5

(756 pages, 24.6 MB PDF)

This book is an indispensable reference guide and sourcebook for anyone using the new and powerful Commodore 128 computer. This machine has many new and exciting built-in features, such as the advanced BASIC programming language Version 7.0, superior graphics, and excellent sound and music capabilities. All information on these and other technical details, such as machine language programming, memory maps, input/output guide, pinout diagrams of primary chips, and schematics of the computer, are here in this, the only official Commodore 128 Programmer’s Reference Guide.

Whether you are a new user or an advanced programmer, you’ll benefit from all of the material in this book. Find out more about:

  • The New BASIC 7.0 – Explaining new BASIC with advanced features
  • Graphics – Utilizing the Commodore 128′s graphics programming
  • Sound and Music – Getting the notes out of the C128
  • Machine Language – Programming in machine language and combining it with BASIC
  • Operating System – Understanding the C128 operating system, the kernal, and memory management
  • Screen Editor and Memory Maps – Deciphering the C128, C64, and CP/M modes
  • Input/Output Guide ? Controlling peripherals through software
  • Chips – Specifications and pinouts of all important chips
  • All this and much, much more

In my quest to preserve retrocomputing documents, here is the official Commodore 128 Programmer’s Reference Guide. As always, my scanned books come with a table of contents and are fully searchable.