Reverse Engineering the MOS 6502 CPU [video]

Here is the video recording of my presentation “Reverse Engineering the MOS 6502 CPU” given at 27C3, on the low cost CPU that arguably launched the home computer revolution.

A high-quality MP4/H.264 video file of the presentation can be downloaded here.

P.S.: If you enjoyed this, you might also like my “Ultimate Commodore 64 Talk”

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26 Responses to “Reverse Engineering the MOS 6502 CPU [video]”

  1. [...] Some Assembly Required « Comparing BitTorrent Downloads of Interlaced TV Shows Reverse Engineering the MOS 6502 CPU [video] [...]

  2. kode80 says:

    I cut my early coding teeth on the Z80 (gameboy + gameboy color) and always looked on to the 6502 but never got the chance. This was a fascinating presentation thank you!

  3. Boris says:

    Great talk, great work on the good old 6502!

    I programmed the 6502 in my Apple ][ when I was young and it was a lot of fun. In these days I was able to write down machine code in hex, no need for an assembler.
    I also played around with illegal opcode at this time, but not in a serious matter.

  4. Bryan says:

    It was a fascinating talk, some of it is a bit hard to grasp but you did a good job of going back and explaining things more clearly.

    Remarkable how complex CPU’s are, even earlier designs, a lot of complex design.. timing and math.

    I don’t think people realize just how amazing it is, especially considering most people have a supercomputer in their pocket (..cell phones, PDA’s, hell.. even their watches).

    Great work.
    -Bryan.

  5. [...] out this post for the rest of the presentation. I’ll be watching them later tonight. You might also likeSet [...]

  6. Vlad says:

    Great talk, Michael.

  7. nossralf says:

    This was a great talk. I enjoyed it very much. Thanks.

    I got such a huge kick out of hearing what sounded like “basically you simulate all of physics” delivered deadpan with a German accent. For some reason I found that hilarious. Anyway…

  8. 5k3105 says:

    Great talk!

    Did you contact Professor Hanson to see where he got his information from?

    Thanks

  9. Jeremy says:

    Great talk. I’m glad you explained the lost BRK and the redundant store issues.
    Thanks!

  10. [...] video above is just the first part. You can see all the parts in order at his website, pagetable.com. Filed under: EE — by johngineer, posted January 7, 2011 at 12:01 pm Comments [...]

  11. [...] If you enjoyed this, you might also like my “Reverse Engineering the MOS 6502 CPU” [...]

  12. Mark says:

    Very interesting talk!
    Out of curiosity, what software did you use for the presentation?

  13. [...] out this post for the rest of the presentation. I’ll be watching them later [...]

  14. Michael Steil says:

    @Mark: I used Apple Keynote, as always. :-) And yes, I abused it a little.

  15. [...] #6502 #obsession http://bit.ly/pagetableP517 (tags: 6502 obsession good video simulation simulator emulator physics electronics transistor ic how microcontroller microprocessor history) [...]

  16. Just saw the Atari Lynx mentioned in it. Still have such a unit in my drawer, and it still works. I only played a single game on it: Chip’s Challenge. And for that you _needed_ a good joystick – I couldn’t handle the Lynx’s internal control pad, so I added a DB9 (?) joystick connector to it so that I could use a proper joystick with it. I still remember the blip playing sounds it makes. BTW, later I helped porting Oxyd to the Mac+Amiga, which was kind of similar in its play. Oh, the joy of those old 8 bit games…

  17. Andrzej says:

    Hi, there is any chance to make public sources (maybe on github) your perfect6502 simulator? Would be really great! Thx for great presentation, amazing stuff.

  18. CeDeROM says:

    AVE!!! :-) 8-BIT POWERS!!! :-)

  19. David Mercer says:

    Just saw this video surfing around youtube, linked from physics channels of all things…the above ‘you simulate all the physics’ comment above might be why :)

    Anyway, i very much enjoyed it, that’s an amazing one hour presentation. It was nice to see some of the underpinnings of WHY the 6502 wasn’t completely orthoganal in addressing modes all these years after programming it in machine code and later asm in middle school in the 80s.

    Yes, the 68000 was such a dream after that (oh my god, its full of registers!)

    Another quick asm programmer tale….when i lived in Boulder, CO in the 90s a friend of mine (who worked on the BSD project at Berkeley) said “hey, i know where the guy who did the segmented addressing model for the 8088 lives, wanna go get all the programmers in town and torches and pitch-forks?” I laughed, remembered much pain, and seriously considered his proposition. He’s French, so I think he half meant it, at least (a very bored Frenchman at that moment, and sober to boot).

    Great site, thanks!

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  21. Shubham Ji says:

    Sir/madam,
    I had assembled before 20 years a MP-6502 microcomputer. Now I have lost OR sold it by mistake.
    Now I am uploading videos on YouTube. Would you like to see ?
    If yes, I will be happy to see you inside of youtube’s above website.
    Thanks and sorry for inconvenience (if any).

    S.JI

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